The week that was. April 30 – May 6

In case you missed it.

In case you missed it.

 

April 30, 1943 The Man Who Never Was – The idea was a head fake, disinformation planted into the hands of Nazi Germany…

May 1, 1863  Flags of the Confederacy – Learning from our history, rather than hiding from it.

May 2, 1939 Lucky Man – The life and baseball career of the “Iron Horse”.  Lou Gehrig.

May 3, 1915 The Red Poppy – The story of the international symbol of Remembrance.

May 4, 1945 The Strangest Battle of WWII – The day the Wehrmacht fought side by side with American soldiers, against Nazi SS.

May 5, 1945 Fire Balloon –  The only Americans killed by enemy action  on the American continent in WW2, were a pregnant Sunday school teacher and five children.

May 6, 1937 Hindenburg – There’s something that the film doesn’t show.

The week that was. April 23 – 29

In Case you Missed It.

April 23, 1982, Conch Republic – The day that Key West seceded, to become the “Conch Republic”.

April 24, 1959 The Day the Music Died – One day, the future singer/songwriter would pen the words “February made me shiver, with every paper I’d deliver”.

April 25, 1976 Don’t Do it Around Me – Describing the “protesters”, Monday said “He got down on his knees, and I could tell he wasn’t throwing holy water on it”.

April 26, 1859 “Devil Dan” Sickles – Just in case you thought your own member of congress was a piece of work…

April 27, 1944 Exercise Tiger – The D-Day rehearsal that killed nearly five times as many Americans, as the live landing on Utah Beach.

April 28, 1192 Assassins – Scary as they were, there came a time when the Order of the Assassins tangled with someone scarier than themselves.

April 29, 1915 The Wipers Times – Bringing Sanity through Humor to the Horrors of the Trenches.

The week that was. April 16 – 22

In case you missed it.

April 16, 1917 The Sealed Train – This “bacillus” set loose by the Kaiser, would change the course of the 20th century.

April 17, 1961 Bay of Pigs – When President Kennedy saw the paper, he said that Castro didn’t need spies.  All he had to do was read the news.

April 18, 1943 Terrible Resolve – Isoroku Yamamoto had the unenviable task of planning the attack on Pearl Harbor, but he was an unwilling participant in his own history

April 19, 1775  Shot Heard ‘Round the World – Some guys, are not to be trifled with.  80-year-old Samuel Whittemore, was one of those.

April 20, 1453 Fall of Constantinople – The end of the Middle Ages, beginning of the Renaissance, the reason Ferdinand and Isabella teamed up with an Italian explorer, in 1492.

April 21, 753 BC Rome – 2,000 years later, the ancient civilization of Rome still permeates our everyday lives.

April 22, 1918 – The Red Baron – The rise and fall of the most successful Ace of the “Great War”.

January 30, 1948 Hear no Evil

The first known depiction of the “Three Mystic Apes” appears over the doors of the Tōshō-gū shrine in Nikkō, Japan, carved sometime in the 17th century

The Analects of Confucius is a written record of the sayings of the philosopher and his contemporaries, compiled between 475 and 221BC.  In it, a follower named Yen Yüan asked the Master about perfect virtue. Confucius said, “To subdue one’s self and return to propriety, is perfect virtue. If a man can for one day subdue himself and return to propriety, all under heaven will ascribe perfect virtue to him”.

analectsofconfuciuspic“I beg to ask the steps of that process”, asked Yen Yüan.  The Master replied, “Look not at what is contrary to propriety.  Listen not to what is contrary to propriety.  Speak not what is contrary to propriety.  Make no movement which is contrary to propriety”.

The idea was not new. Zarathrusta, also known as Zoroaster, is in some respects the father of the world’s first monotheistic religion. It was sometime around 1200BC when Zoroaster taught his followers on the high Iranian Plateau “Humata, Hukhta, Hvarshta”, or “Good Thoughts, Good Words, Good Deeds”.

The Confucian maxim may have crossed from China to Japan with a Tendai-Buddhist legend, sometime around the 8th century. At the time, the story had nothing to do with monkeys.

In medieval Japanese, mi-zaru, kika-zaru, and iwa-zaru translate as “don’t see, don’t hear, and don’t speak”, -zaru being an archaic negative verb conjugation and pronounced similarly to “saru”, the word for monkey.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The visual play on words, then, depicts Mizaru, covering his eyes, Kikazaru, covering his ears, and Iwazaru, covering his mouth. Though it’s rare to see him anymore, there is a fourth monkey. Shizaru is generally depicted with his arms crossed or covering his privates, the name variously translated as “do no evil”, or “know no evil”.

The first known depiction of the “Three Mystic Apes” appears over the doors of the Tōshō-gū shrine in Nikkō, Japan, carved sometime in the 17th century.toshogu

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was a Hindu lawyer, member of the merchant caste from coastal Gujarat, in western India. Today he is known by the honorific “Mahatma”, from gandhithe Sanskrit “high-souled”, or “venerable”.  He is recognized as the Father of modern India, who brought Independence to his country through non-violent protest. Gandhi lived a life of poverty and simplicity, owning almost no material possessions at the time of his assassination by a Hindu nationalist on January 30, 1948. Beside the clothes on his back, Gandhi owned a tin cup and a spoon, a pair of sandals, his spectacles, and a carved set of 3 monkeys, reminding him to hear no evil, see no evil and speak no evil.